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How to Backup Router Configuration to TFTP Server

Knowing how to backup router configuration to TFTP server couldn’t be more stressed. Just like any backup that we are advised to create, it aims to safe keep a copy of the software that keeps our router running smoothly. Routers are meant to send data packets along networks. It helps data to seamlessly travel from one connected router to another until it reaches its destination. This function of the router to direct traffic on the Internet is secured despite possible system failure if you know how to backup router configuration to the TFTP server.
 
Before we proceed with understanding how to backup router configuration to TFTP server, let’s try to review the technical terms first.

How to Backup Router Configuration to TFTP Server


What is router configuration? 

You already know what a router is and how it works for your system. Thus, router configuration refers to the software configuration of the router which enables it to provide a specific function and operate within the computer system. You can prepare a backup using other routers, servers and safely secure the copy in your PC. In this article, we will only be discussing how to backup router configuration to TFTP server.

What is TFTP? 
TFTP is the acronym for Trivial File Transfer Protocol. TFTP uses UDP, and not TCP, for transferring of files. Since it is using UDP that is connectionless, TFTP file transfers are not recommended for networks with much latency, such as the Internet. The good thing about it is that, because UDP doesn’t use any kind of acknowledgments, it is faster than TCP. Understanding how to backup router configuration to TFTP server can provide faster file transfers as you secure your router data.

Why You Need to Know How to Backup Router Configuration to TFTP Server 

So now, why do we need to know how to backup router configuration to TFTP server? Keeping regular backups of your router configuration files and storing them in a safe place secure them in case of a serious system failure that usually damages both the hardware and software configurations of a router. How does knowing how to backup router configuration to TFTP server save your network from such loss? A major system failure will require you to reconstruct a complex router configuration file from mere recall. That is definitely not an easy task. Knowing how to backup router configuration to TFTP server provides that copy of the configuration lost during system failure. Using your backup file, you can easily fix your router and have it working right away within minutes.

 

Knowinghow to backup router configuration to TFTP server enables you to secure your configuration file anytime, as frequent as possible. Is it necessary to create backups regularly? Definitely. In a large network, you can expect a few failures every year. In all those times, losing your configuration file will surely make things difficult for you and your system to bounce back after a system failure. Though system failure is not so frequent, a regular backup is still needed because the human error, which is more common that system failure, can easily result in complete or partial loss of the configuration file.

Also, securing router configuration files helps secure passwords and IP addresses that your router contains. These files are readily accessible even without logging into the TFTP server, making it unsecure.

Steps How to Backup Router Configuration to TFTP Server and Restore a Configuration 

Here is a simple walkthrough on how to backup router configuration to TFTP server and restore a configuration. This will involve copying a configuration from a router to a TFTP server and back to another router.

First, you need to secure that you meet the requirement:

a TFTP server on the network to which you have IP connectivity.

Now, let’s start with how to backup router configuration to TFTP server.

Step 1
At the Router> prompt, issue the enable command, and provide the required password when prompted.
The prompt changes to Router#, which indicates that the router is now in privileged mode.

Step 2
Copy the running configuration file to the TFTP server:

CE_2#copy running-config tftp:
Address or name of remote host []? 64.104.207.171
Destination filename [ce_2-confg]? backup_cfg_for_my_router
!!
1030 bytes copied in 2.489 secs (395 bytes/sec)
CE_2#

Step 3

Open the configuration file with a text editor. Search for and remove any line that starts with “AAA”.
Note: This step is to remove any security commands that can lock you out of the router.

Step 4
Copy the configuration file from the TFTP server to a new router in privileged (enable) mode which has a basic configuration.

Router#copy tftp: running-config
Address or name of remote host []? 64.104.207.171
Source filename []? backup_cfg_for_my_router
Destination filename [running-config]?
Accessing tftp://10.66.64.10/backup_cfg_for_my_router…
Loading backup_cfg_for_router from 64.104.207.171 (via FastEthernet0/0): !
[OK – 1030 bytes]

1030 bytes copied in 9.612 secs (107 bytes/sec)
CE_2#

After knowing how to backup router configuration to TFTP server, let’s restore a configuration. This example is to save the running config to a TFTP server (10.1.1.1) every Sunday at 23:00:

Router(config)#kron policy-list Backup

Router(config-kron-policy)#cli show run | redirect
tftp://10.1.1.1/test.cfg
Router(config-kron-policy)#exit
!
Router(config)#kron occurrence Backup at 23:00 Sun recurring
Router(config-kron-occurrence)#policy-list Backup

Then verify. Use the show running-config command to confirm that the configuration file has been copied to the destination router.

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